Climate agreement to drive GCC cooling shake-up

HVAC outfits operating in the Middle East will have to find environmentally preferable coolants, following the ratification of an amendment to the 1987 Montreal Protocol

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The recently signed amendment to the 1987 Montreal Protocol will spur the Middle East’s HVAC community to identify environmentally preferable coolants, according to Honeywell.
The recently signed amendment to the 1987 Montreal Protocol will spur the Middle East’s HVAC community to identify environmentally preferable coolants, according to Honeywell.

Companies operating in the Middle East’s heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) sector look set to increase efforts to identify environmentally preferable coolants.

This is the view of Honeywell, which released a statement about alternative coolants following the signing of an amendment to the 1987 Montreal Protocol by more than 190 countries.

Novel coolants for air conditioning systems and refrigerators will have to be sourced to meet the requirements of the agreement, which is designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The amendment, which will reduce the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) materials used in AC units, is the result of efforts that began at last year’s Dubai Pathway meeting.

Commenting on the latest agreement, Amir Naqvi, business development manager at Honeywell Fluorine Products Middle East, said: “The amendment to the Montreal Protocol is one of the most significant steps the world has taken to reduce the use of HFC gases.

“This agreement is particularly relevant to the Middle East, as governments continuously strive to increase their energy efficiency and climate control efforts to meet regional goals such as Saudi Vision 2030 and the UAE’s Estidama programme.”

By reducing the use of chemicals with high global warming potential (GWP), the amendment aims to limit the global temperature increase to less than 0.5°C by the end of this century.

Honeywell noted that it is producing next-generation, environmentally preferable alternatives, such as the products available under its Solstice line. Such options will enable building owners and operators to accelerate the transition from HFCs and other high-GWP materials.

The firm began developing HFC alternatives in the early 2000s.

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